Last edited by Tojajora
Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

3 edition of African Americans in the 1870 census found in the catalog.

African Americans in the 1870 census

African Americans in the 1870 census

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  • 2 Currently reading

Published by HeritageQuest in North Salt Lake, UT .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • African Americans -- Genealogy,
  • Registers of births, etc. -- United States,
  • United States -- Census, 1870 -- Indexes

  • About the Edition

    Allows the user to locate every African American householed in the 1870 census, the first census to list African Americans. Information is extracted from original U.S. federal census schedules. Indexed names include heads-of-household and any person with a different surname than the head. Information details surname, given name, age, sex, race (black or mulatto), birthplace, locality, and county.

    Edition Notes

    Other titlesAfrican Americans in the U.S. federal census, 1870
    GenreGenealogy, Indexes
    SeriesWorld immigration series, World immigration series (HeritageQuest (Firm))
    ContributionsHeritageQuest (Firm)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE185.2
    The Physical Object
    FormatElectronic resource
    Pagination1 CD-ROM
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23190213M
    LC Control Number2005567105

    The census was the first federal census to list African Americans by name. That census shows 77 African-Americans with the surname McGough: 31 in Georgia, 21 in Louisiana, 15 in Louisiana, 9 in Arkansas, and 1 in Mississippi. Without exception, these persons could neither read nor write. Free African Americans were listed by name in the Federal Census prior to the Civil War. Slaves’ names were not recorded in the U.S. Census until after the war, in

    SURNAME MATCHES FOR AFRICAN AMERICANS ON CENSUS. Transcribed by Tom Blake, February, PURPOSE. Published information giving names of slaveholders and numbers of slaves held in Marshall County, Mississippi, in , is either non-existent or not readily available. It is possible to locate a free person on the Marshall County.   After emancipation most African American persons were included in general records such as census records, vital records, school records, voter registration and so on. But it can be very difficult to find African American ancestors prior to and this challenge is sometimes referred to as the “ Brick Wall.”.

    In the census blacks made up percent of the state's population. In the previous decade the African American population had dramatically risen from 6, to 17, Black settlement was concentrated primarily in the eastern part of the state, particularly in Atchison, Douglas, Leavenworth, and Wyandotte counties.   Trouble So Hard: Labor and Life in the African-American Community, Edentown, North Carolina, Labor and Life in the African-American Community, Eden Town, North Carolina, [Childs, Audrey Jean Sapp] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Trouble So Hard: Labor and Life in the African-American Community, Edentown, North Carolina, Reviews: 1.


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African Americans in the 1870 census Download PDF EPUB FB2

Beginning inthe census listed the names of all African Americans. Local Census and County Records State census records, school census records, town census records, deeds, bills of sale, marriage records, county will books and probate records sometimes lists names of slaves, and other genealogy information.

Even worse, during this period, many African Americans—some using surnames for the very first time—changed their surnames once or even several times. The same family may appear with different surnames in the and federal census records, and may appear in other records with either, both, or a third surname altogether.

Surname matching of slaveholders with African Americans is intended merely as suggesting another possibility for further research by those seeking to make connections between slaves and holders.

Updates (May and October ) regarding availability of slaveholder census indexes. The late Ronald Vern Jackson authored or was lead author for. The population census is a great source, as it enumerated many African Americans, for the first time by name.

census schedules may also present discrepancies or conflicts with historical family data. Given names and/or surnames, and specific locations may differ from our data. rows  The United States Census of was the ninth United States was conducted Country: United States.

The Archives holds a wealth of material documenting the African American experience, and highlights these resources online, in programs, and through traditional and social media. Resources for African American ResearchContact Us Guide to Black History Records relating to African Americans at the National Archives Black Power Portal Records relating to the Black Power.

African Americans in the census. [Novato, CA]: Broderbund, c 1 computer laser optical disc; 1 user's manual (19 p.: 12 cm.). E B76 Overview - Census Census Bureau.

Index of Questions Census Bureau. Census of Population and Housing Census Bureau. Volume 1. The statistics of the population of the United States, embracing the tables of race, nationality, sex, selected ages, and which are added the statistics of school attendance and illiteracy, of schools, libraries, newspapers, periodicals, churches.

Census Geography. 37 States - New States in Census: West Virginia, Nebraska, Kansas and Nevada; Territories – Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Colorado, Idaho, Arizona, Utah, Wyoming, Montana, Washington, Dakota and Indian; Facts. President during census: Ulysses S.

Grant; Census was the first census after the Civil War and. This list consists of names taken from the official United States Federal Census, and focuses on the Sebastian County Census. The names of the African Americans are included here in the order in which the names appeared on the census.

The list was originally published in the first two issues of The Frontier Freedman's Journal, and can be.

Each position in a row and column corresponded to a specific data entry on the census schedule. Census Bureau clerks using pantographs could prepare approximately cards per day.

Negro population of Georgia by counties. Diagram shows map of Georgia with colors to mark the number of African Americans in each county. For African Americans who were enslaved until the 13th Amendment was passed inthe census was the first federal census to name them.

Since the slave schedules of the and censuses only referred to slaves by tick marks, sex, and age, connecting the people identified in to their pre-emancipation identities is a. U.S. Census before getting stumped with the Census.

Some African American geneal-ogists don’t find their ancestors on the census and try to go from the Census to the Census Slave is a dif-ficult leap of twenty years through the most tumultuous period of our nation’s history,which can cause all.

The census did not list him. The census remains, for those researching African-Americans, the most critical census of all. But it’s a brick wall that can, with diligent research, come crashing down. (Update, Read the post on Understanding the Slave Community to learn to create a research tool for analyzing the census.).

African Americans were enumerated by name in federal census population schedules along with other U.S. residents from to the present. Most researchers will be able to locate African Americans using the same methodology practiced by other genealogists. However, many African Americans are difficult to find in the census, which is the.

Women and African American History: • 15th Amendment to the US Constitution gave the right to vote without regard to "race, color, or previous condition of servitude" -- but the Amendment did not apply to African American women (or any other women).

Get this from a library. African-Americans in the U.S. federal census. -- "The Heritage Quest index is the first to include all African-American heads-of-household in the entire country."--Introduction.

The United States Census was the first census in the history of the United States. The population of the United States was recorded as 3, as of Census Day, August 2,as mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the United States Constitution and applicable laws. "The law required that every household be visited, that completed census schedules be posted in two of the most public.

This resource contains approximatelyAfrican-American individuals who were enumerated in the federal census returns. Areas represented include Georgia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia, as well as the counties containing the cities of Baltimore, Chicago, New York City, and St.

Louis. If you do African American genealogy, you’ve no doubt heard about the “brick wall” of That’s the year of the first post-Emancipation U.S. federal Census. Beforewe have to rely on records from the era of slavery, when the majority of African-Americans were treated as property.

When speaking of searching U.S. census records, Smith posed a question: “Why would I [suggest looking at] the census from to ?” Many believe that searching a U.S. census for African Americans before the census (the first census after slavery was abolished) will be fruitless, because slaves were not included on census records.This database details those persons enumerated in the United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States.

In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M, rolls; part of Minnesota TAfrican Americans, just like our first lady, are a racially mixed or mulatto people—deeply and overwhelmingly so.

Fact: Fully 58 percent of African American people, according to geneticist Mark Shriver at Morehouse College, possess at least percent European ancestry (again, the equivalent of that one great-grandparent).